Archive - November, 2011

Family pic stick-in-the-mud

crazy family pic

Thanksgiving was fun. All of our kids were home along with new spouses and friends.

Our meal preparations were lively as the bustle around the kitchen was full of laughter and stories and conversation and an overabundance of excellent cooks.

We moved the dining room table into the living room, added the leaves, pushed the breakfast table next to it and seated fourteen all together. It was delightful. That was Thursday.

Saturday, we planned to make a family picture. Family pictures tend to become aggravating events–worth it, but aggravating.

This year’s picture will probably be memorialized among my clan as the year that dad (that’s me) displayed my own lack of self-control. If the saying is true that “You can tell the size of a man by the size of the things that upset him,” then I was the smallest one in the picture. Continue Reading…

Defiant kid? Give Her Vitamin N

pic of defiant girl

“He looked me straight in the eye and said, ‘NO!’ at the top of his lungs.”

“I told her she couldn’t go to a movie with her friends. She sneaked out her window and went anyway.”

“He’s always facing off with me when his father is out of town. He knows better than to do it when his father is home.”

Defiance is a mountain–a very big mountain–if you don’t conquer it. And the earlier you climb it in your child’s life, the better. Continue Reading…

Does your kid lie?

Pinocchio's nose

John Medina, in his new book, Brain Rules for Baby, says that the research shows that four-year-olds lie about once every two hours and six-year olds once every ninety minutes. Some of these studies were done inside their homes, not in a clinic.

The Bible indicates that every man, woman, and child is prone to lie. (Only Jesus did not lie, but he did tell some whopping big truths!)

So what do we do about lying? Continue Reading…

Jumping Rope Without a Rope

Kids jumping rope without a rope

 

“By 1984, the California legislature had created an official self-esteem task force, believing that improving citizens’ self-esteem would do everything from lower dependence on welfare to decrease teen pregnancy. Such arguments turned self-esteem into an unstoppable train, particularly when it came to children. Anything potentially damaging to kids’ self-esteem was axed. Competitions were frowned upon. Soccer coaches stopped counting goals and handed out trophies to everyone. Teachers threw out their red pencils. Criticism was replaced with ubiquitous, even undeserved, praise. (There’s even a school district in Massachusetts that has kids in gym class ‘jumping rope’ without a rope–lest they suffer the embarrassment of tripping).” Continue Reading…